Int J Med Sci 2013; 10(8):965-973. doi:10.7150/ijms.5377 This issue Cite

Research Paper

Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition

Manfred Hauben 1, 2, 3, 4,✉, Eric Y. Hung1

1. Pfizer Inc (where work was performed)
2. New York University School of Medicine
3. New York Medical College
4. Brunel University

Citation:
Hauben M, Hung EY. Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition. Int J Med Sci 2013; 10(8):965-973. doi:10.7150/ijms.5377. https://www.medsci.org/v10p0965.htm
Other styles

File import instruction

Abstract

Introduction: Pneumothorax is either primary or secondary. Secondary pneumothorax is usually due to trauma, including various non-pharmacologic iatrogenic triggers. Although not normally thought of as an adverse drug event (ADE) secondary pneumothorax is associated with numerous drugs, though it is often difficult to determine whether this association is causal in nature, or reflects an epiphenomenon of efficacy or inefficacy, or confounding by indication (CBI). Herein we explore this association in a large health authority drug safety surveillance database.

Methods: A quantitative pharmacovigilance (PhV) methodology known as disproportionality analysis was applied to the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database to explore the quantitative reporting dependencies between drugs and the adverse event pneumothorax as well the corresponding reporting dependencies between drugs and reported indications that may be risk factors for pneumothorax themselves in order to explore the potential contribution of CBI.

Results: We found 1. Multiple drugs are associated with pneumothorax; 2. Surfactants and oncology drugs account for most statistically distinctive associations with pneumothorax; 3. Pulmonary surfactants, pentamidine and nitric oxide have the largest statistical reporting associations 4. CBI may play a prominent role in reports of drug-associated pneumothorax.

Conclusions: Disproportionality analysis (DA) can provide insights into the spontaneous reporting dependencies between drugs and pneumothorax. CBI assessment based on DA and Cornfield's inequality presents an additional novel option for the initial exploration of potential safety signals in PhV.

Keywords: Pneumothorax, disproportionality analysis


Citation styles

APA
Hauben, M., Hung, E.Y. (2013). Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition. International Journal of Medical Sciences, 10(8), 965-973. https://doi.org/10.7150/ijms.5377.

ACS
Hauben, M.; Hung, E.Y. Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition. Int. J. Med. Sci. 2013, 10 (8), 965-973. DOI: 10.7150/ijms.5377.

NLM
Hauben M, Hung EY. Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition. Int J Med Sci 2013; 10(8):965-973. doi:10.7150/ijms.5377. https://www.medsci.org/v10p0965.htm

CSE
Hauben M, Hung EY. 2013. Pneumothorax as an Adverse Drug Event: An Exploratory Aggregate Analysis of the US FDA AERS Database Including a Confounding by Indication Analysis Inspired by Cornfield's Condition. Int J Med Sci. 10(8):965-973.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC) License. See http://ivyspring.com/terms for full terms and conditions.