Int J Med Sci 2022; 19(8):1227-1234. doi:10.7150/ijms.73080 This issue

Research Paper

The influence of cerebral small vessel diseases on the efficacy of repositioning therapy and prognosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

Jian Zang, Xuejun Jiang, Shuai Feng, Hongyang Zhang

Department of Otolaryngology, the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China.

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Citation:
Zang J, Jiang X, Feng S, Zhang H. The influence of cerebral small vessel diseases on the efficacy of repositioning therapy and prognosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Int J Med Sci 2022; 19(8):1227-1234. doi:10.7150/ijms.73080. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v19p1227.htm

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Abstract

Graphic abstract

Background: Although vascular risk factors have been found to be closely related to the development of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the relationship between BPPV and cerebral small vessels diseases (CSVDs) has rarely been discussed in literature. This study set out to investigate the efficacy of repositioning therapy and prognosis among BPPV patients with CSVDs.

Methods: We enrolled 553 BPPV patients who had undergone brain MRI, and categorized them into two groups based on the presence or absence of CSVDs. After controlling for other confounders using a propensity score matching (PSM) approach, we compared the incidence of recurrence and residual dizziness (RD). Then, we analyzed the recurrence rate and RD incidence in 176 BPPV patients with CSVDs, and assessed potential risk factors.

Results: White matter hyperintensity (WMH, 72.2%) and lacunar infarction (LI, 65.9%) were the two CSVDs that were present in the highest proportion among the BPPV patients. The incidence of RD in patients with CSVDs was significantly higher compared to subjects without CSVDs. Patients with RD (n=100, 56.8%) were older, had more severe WMH, and had a higher incidence of brain atrophy; age and higher Fazekas score were independent risk factors. Among the recurrent patients (n=61, 34.7%), the ages were older, the Fazekas score of WMH was higher, and number of LIs was increased; age was the sole independent risk factor.

Conclusion: BPPV patients with a combination of CSVD comorbidities, especially elderly patients with WMHs, are more likely to develop RD, which needs to be paid more attention.

Keywords: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, BPPV, Cerebral small vessels diseases, CSVD, Recurrence, Residual dizziness, White matter hyperintensity