Int J Med Sci 2022; 19(3):460-471. doi:10.7150/ijms.67967 This issue

Research Paper

Influence of ambulatory blood pressure-related indicators within 24 h on in-hospital death in sepsis patients

Fengshuo Xu, BD1,2,3*, Luming Zhang, MD1,3*, Tao Huang, MD3, Rui Yang, MD2,3, Didi Han, BD2,3, Shuai Zheng, BD3,4, Aozi Feng, PhD3, Liying Huang, MD3, Haiyan Yin, MD, PhD1✉, Jun Lyu, MD, phD3✉

1. Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.
2. School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China.
3. Department of Clinical Research, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.
4. School of Public Health, Shaanxi University of Chinese Medicine, Xianyang, Shaanxi Province, China.
*These authors contributed equally to this work.

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Citation:
Xu F, Zhang L, Huang T, Yang R, Han D, Zheng S, Feng A, Huang L, Yin H, Lyu J. Influence of ambulatory blood pressure-related indicators within 24 h on in-hospital death in sepsis patients. Int J Med Sci 2022; 19(3):460-471. doi:10.7150/ijms.67967. Available from https://www.medsci.org/v19p0460.htm

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Abstract

Graphic abstract

Background: Sepsis is a serious public health problem worldwide. Blood pressure is one of the indicators that is closely monitored in intensive-care units, and it reflects complex interactions between the internal cardiovascular control mechanism and the external environment. We aimed to determine the impact of indicators related to the ambulatory blood pressure on the prognosis of sepsis patients.

Methods: This retrospective study was based on the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care IV database. Relevant information about sepsis patients was extracted according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Examined parameters included the average blood pressure, blood pressure variability (BPV), and circadian rhythm, and the study outcome was in-hospital death. We investigated the effects of these indicators on the risk of in-hospital death among sepsis patients using Cox proportional-hazards models, restricted cubic splines analysis, and subgroup analysis.

Results: This study enrolled 10,316 sepsis patients, among whom 2,117 died during hospitalization. All parameters except the nighttime variation coefficient of the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were associated with in-hospital death of sepsis patients. All parameters except for fluctuations in DBP exhibited nonlinear correlations with the outcome. The subgroup analysis revealed that some of the examined parameters were associated with in-hospital death only in certain subgroups.

Conclusion: Indicators related to the ambulatory blood pressure within 24 h are related to the prognosis of sepsis patients. When treating sepsis, in addition to blood pressure, attention should also be paid to BPV and the circadian rhythm in order to improve the prognosis and the survival rate.

Keywords: sepsis, ambulatory blood pressure, in-hospital death, MIMIC-IV