Int J Med Sci 2015; 12(12):980-986. doi:10.7150/ijms.13203 This issue Cite

Research Paper

No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia

Josef Yayan1✉, Beniam Ghebremedhin2, Kurt Rasche1

1. Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine, HELIOS Clinic Wuppertal, Germany
2. Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Institute of Medical Laboratory Diagnostics, Center for Clinical and Translational Research, HELIOS Clinic Wuppertal, Germany

Citation:
Yayan J, Ghebremedhin B, Rasche K. No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Int J Med Sci 2015; 12(12):980-986. doi:10.7150/ijms.13203. https://www.medsci.org/v12p0980.htm
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Abstract

Objectives: Group B Streptococcus is a primary source of pneumonia, which is a leading cause of death worldwide. During the last few decades, there has been news of growing antibiotic resistance in group B streptococci to penicillin and different antibiotic agents. This clinical study retrospectively analyzes antimicrobial resistance in inpatients who were diagnosed with group B streptococcal pneumonia.

Methods: All of the required information from inpatients who were identified to have group B streptococcal pneumonia was sourced from the database at the Department of Internal Medicine of HELIOS Clinic Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University, in Germany, from 2004-2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for the different antimicrobial agents that were regularly administered to these inpatients.

Results: Sixty-six inpatients with a mean age of 63.3 ± 16.1 years (45 males [68.2%, 95% CI 60.0%-79.4%] and 21 females [31.8%, 95% CI 20.6%-43.0%]) were detected to have group B streptococcal pneumonia within the study period from January 1, 2004, to August 12, 2014. Group B Streptococcus had a high resistance rate to gentamicin (12.1%), erythromycin (12.1%), clindamycin (9.1%), and co-trimoxazole (3.0%), but it was not resistant to penicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, or vancomycin (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: No resistance to penicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, or vancomycin was detected among inpatients with pneumonia caused by group B streptococci.

Keywords: Antibiotic, Pneumonia, Resistance, Sensitivity, Group B Streptococcus


Citation styles

APA
Yayan, J., Ghebremedhin, B., Rasche, K. (2015). No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia. International Journal of Medical Sciences, 12(12), 980-986. https://doi.org/10.7150/ijms.13203.

ACS
Yayan, J.; Ghebremedhin, B.; Rasche, K. No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Int. J. Med. Sci. 2015, 12 (12), 980-986. DOI: 10.7150/ijms.13203.

NLM
Yayan J, Ghebremedhin B, Rasche K. No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Int J Med Sci 2015; 12(12):980-986. doi:10.7150/ijms.13203. https://www.medsci.org/v12p0980.htm

CSE
Yayan J, Ghebremedhin B, Rasche K. 2015. No Resistance to Penicillin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, or Vancomycin in Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Int J Med Sci. 12(12):980-986.

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